Great Zimbabwe

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Great Zimbabwe is an ancient city in the southeastern hills of Zimbabwe near Lake Mutirikwe and the town of Masvingo, close to the Chimanimani Mountains and the Chipinge District. It was the capital of the Kingdom of Zimbabwe during the country’s Late Iron Age. Construction on the monument by ancestors of the Shona people began in the 11th century and continued until the 14th century, spanning an area of 722 hectares (1,780 acres) which, at its peak, could have housed up to 18,000 people. It is recognised as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

Great Zimbabwe served as a royal palace for the Zimbabwean monarch and would have been used as the seat of political power. One of its most prominent features were the walls, some of which were over five metres high and which were constructed without mortar. Eventually the city was abandoned and fell into ruin.

The earliest known written mention of the ruins was in 1531 by Vicente Pegado, captain of the Portuguese garrison of Sofala, who recorded it as Symbaoe. The first visits by Europeans were in the late 19th century, with investigations of the site starting in 1871. Later, studies of the monument were controversial in the archaeological world, with political pressure being put upon archaeologists by the government of Rhodesia to deny its construction by black people. Great Zimbabwe has since been adopted as a national monument by the Zimbabwean government, and the modern independent state was named for it. The word “Great” distinguishes the site from the many hundreds of small ruins, now known as ‘zimbabwes’, spread across the Zimbabwe Highveld. There are 200 such sites in southern Africa, such as Bumbusi in Zimbabwe and Manyikeni in Mozambique, with monumental, mortarless walls; Great Zimbabwe is the largest.

The Name

Zimbabwe is the Shona name of the ruins, first recorded in 1531 by Vicente Pegado, Captain of the Portuguese Garrison of Sofala. Pegado noted that “The natives of the country call these edifices Symbaoe, which according to their language signifies ‘court’”.

The name contains dzimba, the Shona term for “houses”. There are two theories for the etymology of the name. The first proposes that the word is derived from Dzimba-dza-mabwe, translated from the Karanga dialect of Shona as “large houses of stone” (dzimba = plural of imba, “house”; mabwe = plural of bwe, “stone”). A second suggests that Zimbabwe is a contracted form of dzimba-hwe, which means “venerated houses” in the Zezuru dialect of Shona, as usually applied to the houses or graves of chiefs.

The majority of scholars believe that it was built by members of the Gokomere culture, who were ancestors of modern Shona in Zimbabwe. A few believe that the ancestors of the Lemba or Venda were responsible, or cooperated with the Gokomere in the construction.

The Great Zimbabwe area was settled by the fourth century of the common era. Between the fourth and the seventh centuries, communities of the Gokomere or Ziwa cultures farmed the valley, and mined and worked iron, but built no stone structures. These are the earliest Iron Age settlements in the area identified from archaeological diggings.

Activities

Accomodation Facilities

 

Tours

 

Architecture Tour

Discover more about Richard Meier’s architecture and the design of the Getty Center site in this 45-minute tour.

Collection Highlights Tour

This one-hour tour provides an overview of major works from the Museum’s collection. Meet at the Information Desk.

Exhibition Tour: Eyewitness Views: Making History in Eighteenth-Century Europe

In this exhibition tour, become an eyewitness to some of the most magnificent ceremonies and dramatic events of 18th-century Europe, as they are represented by Panini, Canaletto, Bellotto, Guardi and other master painters of the time. Meet at the Information Desk.

Garden Tour

Designed and conceived by artist Robert Irwin, the Central Garden is the focus of this 45-minute tour.

 

Events

 

Jameson Victoria Carnival

Discover more about Richard Meier’s architecture and the design of the Getty Center site in this 45-minute tour.

Econet Victoria Falls Marathon

This one-hour tour provides an overview of major works from the Museum’s collection. Meet at the Information Desk.

Exhibition Tour: Eyewitness Views: Making History in Eighteenth-Century Europe

In this exhibition tour, become an eyewitness to some of the most magnificent ceremonies and dramatic events of 18th-century Europe, as they are represented by Panini, Canaletto, Bellotto, Guardi and other master painters of the time. Meet at the Information Desk.

Garden Tour

Designed and conceived by artist Robert Irwin, the Central Garden is the focus of this 45-minute tour.

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